Outcome of information and coping skills training for relatives of drug abusers: A randomised controlled study

Main Article Content

Ulla Zetterlind
Susanna Kovac

Abstract

Background Substance abuse often has a severe influence on family members and relatives and thus, the health of the relatives is also at risk. The aim of the study was to compare two programmes on coping skills and well-being in relatives/good friends of persons with drug use disorders.


Method Forty-three relatives to drug abusers were randomly assigned to one of two interventions: a Coping Skills Training programme (CST) or a Standard Information programme (SI). The CST consisted of one SI-session plus four monthly CST sessions. Five different self-report scales were used to measure symptoms (SCL 90/GSI), coping, social interaction, alcohol and drug use. Follow-up periods were 12 and 24 months.


Results Ninety-eight per cent of the participants completed the first follow-up and eighty-eight per cent the second follow-up. Both groups (CST and SI) showed a decrease in symptoms and coping values after 24 months with a significant better overall coping in the long term for CST.


Conclusion Both programmes led to decreased symptoms and improved coping. The significant lower value on overall coping after 24 months indicates that a long-term intervention programme might be more efficient.

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How to Cite
1.
Zetterlind U, Kovac S. Outcome of information and coping skills training for relatives of drug abusers: A randomised controlled study. ClinHealthPromot [Internet]. 2015 May 1 [cited 2022 Nov. 28];5(1):18-24. Available from: https://www.clinhealthpromot.org/index.php/clinhp/article/view/clinhp15004
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Original article

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