Long-Term Follow-up of Young Children and Adolescents with Parental Alcoholism Who Attended a Group Support Programme for Children 1993-2000

Main Article Content

Ulla Zetterlind
Susanne Vahr Lauridsen
Mette Rasmussen

Abstract

Introduction  The aim was to follow-up children, of parents with alcohol problems, who joined a group support programme in Malmö, Sweden from 1993–2000. Our intension was to investigate mental health and social well-being in these children over a long period of time.


Method  Two follow-ups were conducted, in 2003 and in 2018. In 2003 the follow-up, included a semi-structured interview and six self-report scales (SCL-90, Coping with parent´s abuse, Social interaction, AUDIT, DUDIT and a Stress questionnaire). In 2018 the same scales were used, complemented with the EQ5D questionnaire and a standardized life situation formula.


Results  In 2003, 50% of the 44 attendees worked full-time or part-time. However, sons showed higher values on AUDIT and DUDIT (alcohol and drug use). In 2018, half of the 25 attendees had continued to study. Coping, AUDIT and social interaction changed significantly over time, coping and AUDIT for the better. The EQ5D showed lower quality of life compared to the normal Swedish population, and the life situation questionnaire revealed high levels of stress.


Conclusion  Most attendees had completed their school education, and half of them reported further studies. However, in the 2018 follow-up, they showed increased mental and physical symptoms.

Article Details

How to Cite
1.
Zetterlind U, Lauridsen SV, Rasmussen M. Long-Term Follow-up of Young Children and Adolescents with Parental Alcoholism Who Attended a Group Support Programme for Children 1993-2000. ClinHealthPromot [Internet]. 2022 Mar. 28 [cited 2022 Oct. 1];12(1):e22003:1-9. Available from: https://www.clinhealthpromot.org/index.php/clinhp/article/view/clinhp22003
Section
Original article
Author Biography

Mette Rasmussen, WHO-CC, Clinical Health Promotion Centre, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden

WHO-CC, Clinical Health Promotion Centre, Parker Institute, University of Copenhagen, Bispebjerg-Frederiksberg Hospital, Denmark

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